D.C. Ward 7 Neighborhood Guides

Benning

Walk Benning and find murals around many corners, including some of the city’s oldest ones. It’s also home to a 1942 Art Deco theater that once had the city’s second largest movie screen.

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Benning Heights

Named after the man who owned much of its land in the 19th century, Benning Heights is a mainly residential area with a mural-painted park, historic call boxes painted yellow and blue, and brick homes with yards.

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Benning Ridge

Along the Maryland border and north of Fort Dupont Park, this neighborhood is home to an 1896 Black cemetery, a popular Jamaican takeout restaurant, and several recreation centers.

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Drink:

  • Strawberry lemonade from nearby Bird’s Kitchen, a Black woman-owned restaurant.

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Burrville

Along the Maryland border is a tiny triangular neighborhood with several churches and murals at the local elementary school.

Eat:

  • Chicken wings from nearby Addie Loves Soul, a Black-owned soul food restaurant open every day except Sunday.

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  • Honor those who served at the nearby World War II Memorial, a memorial honoring the citizens of Fairmount Heights, Maryland who served during World War II.
  • Walk along the trails at nearby Marvin Gaye Park, named after the D.C. native musician.

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Capitol View

A neighborhood developed in the 1930s with distant views of the U.S. Capitol and some of the city’s earliest desegregated public housing.

Eat:

  • General Tso’s chicken from Capital Szechuan, a popular neighborhood Chinese takeout restaurant.
  • Made-to-order doughnuts from a stand inside Shrimp Boat Plaza, a small food court by the Benning Metro.
  • Square pizza from Ledo Pizza, a Maryland-born pizza chain with a location inside Shrimp Boat Plaza.

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Central Northeast

Along railroad tracks, Central Northeast is a small neighborhood with old Civil War forts that are now parks, trails, and many murals and mosaics.

Eat:

  • Sub sandwich from Menick’s Market, a corner store with a popular deli inside and a Ward 7 Speaks mural outside.

Drink:

  • Lemonade from nearby Deanwood Deli, a Black-owned deli with a popular crab cake.

Do:

  • Buy flowers from Minnesota Florist, Black-owned and the oldest woman-owned business in D.C.
  • Donate books to the Free Little Library on the former site of one of the city’s smallest public libraries.
  • Hike the trails in Fort Mahan Park, a park on the site of a former Civil War fort.
  • Walk the trail that hugs Watts Branch, a tributary to Anacostia River.

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Civic Betterment

Along the D.C.-Maryland border, Civic Betterment is a small neighborhood that once was considered the city’s most politically active neighborhood.

Eat:

  • Crab cake and “Saucey Wings” from Bird’s Kitchen, a small takeout spot that opened at the end of 2022.
  • Deep dish pizza from nearby The DC Chi Pie, a popular Black-owned pizzeria.
  • Jerk chicken from nearby Pimento Grill, a Jamaican restaurant that’s temporarily closed.
  • Potato salad from nearby Rosebud’s BBQ, a family-owned BBQ spot in Capitol Heights since 2002.

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Deanwood

Once a safe haven for D.C.’s Black community during segregation, Deanwood is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Northeast D.C.

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  • Escape the city at nearby Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens, a 1938 700-acree water garden.
  • Learn about the area’s history by finding Cultural Tourism DC’s plaques throughout the neighborhood.
  • Shop local produce on Saturdays June-October at 11 a.m. at the Marvin Gaye Community Greening Center.
  • Snap a photo of the “Deanwood” mural by Juan Pineda on the side of the old A&S Grocery building.
  • Take your kids to the playground at the Deanwood Recreation Center.
  • Visit the old site of the city’s only amusement park that opened for the Black community during segregation at 5002 Hayes St NE. It’s now a DC Police Deptartment building with murals honoring Black heroes on the outside.

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Dupont Park

Along Pennsylvania Avenue SE, many homes and apartment buildings went up in the 1940s in this small neighborhood. Today, it’s home to Victorian homes, a historic Catholic parish, and several restaurants.

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  • Attend the summer concert series at nearby Fort Dupont Park, a 361-acre park with trails and a community garden.
  • Get passport photos at Earl Howard Studios, a photography studio in the city for decades.
  • Read a book on a bench in the triangle park where Pennsylvania Ave SE, 28th Street SE, and O Street SE meet. There’s public art inside the park.
  • Shop local at Soufside Market, a Black-owned outdoor Saturday market of Black-owned vendors, when it returns.
  • Workout at Planet Fitness, the only gym East of the River.

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East Corner

Often considered part of Northeast Boundary, East Corner is the further east tip of Washington, D.C. with an 18th century boundary stone to prove it. With a Marvin Gaye-themed recreation center and playground, there’s a lot to explore.

Eat:

  • Smothered pork chops from Addie Loves Soul, a Black-owned soul food restaurant open every day except Sunday.

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East River Heights

Often considered part of Benning, East River Heights is a small neighborhood with several blocks of homes, the East River Park shopping center, and many murals.

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Eastland Gardens

A historically Black neighborhood developed in 1928, many of its homes are designed by prominent Black architects. Next to a large park that used to be a city dump that Lady Bird Johnson advocated to close, Eastland Gardens is home to an active civic association and a flower club who beautifies the neighborhood.

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  • Thai iced tea from nearby Sala Thai, a local Thai restaurant with locations throughout the city.

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Fairfax Village

Along the Maryland border, this entirely-residential neighborhood is home to grand homes with manicured lawns and an 1850 farmhouse that once was on a plantation.

Eat:

  • Chicken and waffles from nearby Highlands Cafe and Grill, a Black-owned sit-down restaurant with murals by Aniekan Udofa.
  • Honey butter fried chicken sandwich at nearby Roaming Rooster, a Black family-owned fried chicken sandwich restaurant with 11 locations across the D.C. area.

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Fort Davis

Bordering Maryland, this neighborhood is named after Fort Davis, one of the city’s Civil War defenses. Developed in the 1940s, it’s now an area with single-family homes, a community center, and a park.

Eat:

  • Jerk chicken from nearby Pimento Grill, a popular Jamaican restaurant.
  • Pancakes from nearby White Corner Restaurant, a small breakfast spot where the food is made in front of you.

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Fort Dupont

With two parks built on Civil War fort sites, Fort Dupont is a mainly residential neighborhood with views of the city skyline.

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  • Thai iced tea from nearby Sala Thai, a chain with a location along Minnesota Ave NE. 

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Fort Stanton

Once a Civil War fort defending the Navy Yard is now a small residential neighborhood with a park started by the civic association, a community museum, and a recreation center.

Eat:

  • Honey butter fried chicken sandwich at Roaming Rooster, a local fast-casual restaurant with a location inside the Skyland Town Center, a 7-minute bike ride from Fort Stanton. 

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Good Hope

Often mistaken for Hillcrest, this small residential neighborhood is home to homes in many different architectural styles, wooded areas, and within walking distance to the Skyland Town Center.

Eat:

  • Fried chicken sandwiches from Roaming Rooster, one of 11 locations of the Black-owned restaurant success story.
  • Pastries from the bakery inside Lidl, the city’s first location of the German grocery store with more affordable prices.

Drink:

  • Latte from Starbucks, the city’s only drive-thru location with views of the city skyline.

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Greenway

Along the Anacostia River, the neighborhood went from marshland to a failed luxury home development to housing for defense workers. Today, it’s mainly residential with a bus stop sculpture, murals on storm drains, and a large community center.

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  • Sweet tea lemonade from nearby Norma’s Breakfast, a takeout breakfast restaurant inside a small strip mall.

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Hillbrook

Coming soon

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Hillcrest

Hillcrest is a neighborhood where tulips line the streets, houses that come in all styles have sunrooms and garages, and Little Free Libraries have seeds to share.

Eat:

  • Baked goods from the bakery inside Germany-born Lidl, one of a few grocery stores East of the River.
  • Honey butter fried chicken sandwich from Black-owned Roaming Rooster inside the Skyland Town Center.
  • Personalized pizza from andpizza, a D.C. fast-casual chain known for standing up for their employees. 

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Hill East

In between Capitol Hill and the Anacostia River, this neighborhood is home to native Washingtonians and newcomers. Murals and gardens in alleys and an old Italian deli, there’s a lot to explore in Hill East.

Eat:

  • “Big G” sub from Mangialardo’s, a 1953 family-owned Italian deli open Monday through Friday for lunch.
  • “Lancaster Burger” from Hill East Burger, a restaurant with smoked burgers and a jukebox.
  • Pizza from Slice Joint, a pizzeria inside The Roost with a slide, salad, and soda lunch special.
  • “Pretzel Bomb” from The Pretzel Bakery, the city’s only pretzel bakery.

Drink:

  • Beer at Trusty’s, a popular neighborhood bar with a school bus bar, live music, and trivia nights.
  • Tres leches latte from Cameo, the cafe inside The Roost that’s open every day from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Sour ale from Shelter, a bar inside The Roost with a rotating list of drinks on tap.

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Kenilworth

A neighborhood that displays the history of many nearby neighborhoods, Kenilworth started as a white streetcar suburb. Kenilworth then saw the rise of a middle-class Black community and then the building of one of the city’s first desegregated public housing complexes that’s now being redeveloped. To learn more, read Kenilworth native Joe Lapp’s booklet.

Eat:

  • Wings from nearby Deanwood Deli, a small Black-owned deli in Deanwood.

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  • Bike along the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail, a long trail that goes through meadows and forests.
  • Escape the city at Kenilworth Park, a large green space along the Anacostia River with meadows, trails, and soccer fields.
  • Get your car fixed at Bo’s Quick Repair, a beloved auto mechanic with good reviews and more affordable prices.
  • Jog around the Kenilworth Track, a well-maintained track with nature views and tennis courts nearby.
  • Swim at the Kenilworth Pool, an outdoor pool open from Memorial Day to Labor Day with Aniekan Udofa‘s murals on its outside.

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Lincoln Heights

Originally a Black shantytown, it took a visit in the 1930s by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt for the city to invest in infrastructure. It continued to develop as a haven for Black veterans returning from World War II. Today, it’s home to a top-rated bed and breakfast, hills, and pops of color.

Marshall Heights

Eat:

  • Deep dish pizza from The DC Chi Pie, a Black-owned pizza shop inside the owner’s home.
  • Mumbo sauce at Bally’s Carry Out, a small, no-frills Chinese takeout spot.

Drink:

  • Homemade peach tea from nearby Bird’s Kitchen, a Black woman-owned restaurant with popular banana pudding.

Do:

  • Book a room at Malolo Bed and Breakfast, a bed and breakfast that serves warm breakfast prepared by one of the chef owners.
  • Honor Black history at the Fletcher-Johnson Recreation Center, the site of Payne’s cemetery, one of two Black cemeteries during the 19th century.
  • Read books at the Capitol View Neighborhood Library, a public library with events and sculptures outside.
  • Take your kids to the castle-themed playground at nearby Woody Ward Recreation Center, a space with boxing, an outdoor swimming pool, a track, and old and new murals.
  • Visit nearby Woodlawn Cemetery, an 1895 Black cemetery that houses many prominent Washingtonians. It’s open only five days a year- Veterans Day, Emancipation Day, Memorial Day, Juneteenth, and Labor Day.

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Coming soon

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Mayfair

Built in the 1940s to house the influx of World War II workers, Mayfair has a prominent apartment complex designed by a famous Black architect.

Eat:

  • Fresh produce at FRESHFARM Cesar Chavez, a farmers’ market on Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. June through November. 

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Naylor Gardens

Anchored by a World War II housing complex that’s now a co-op with beautiful lawns, Naylor Gardens is home to the Hillcrest Recreation Center with an enclosed playground and a splash pad.

Eat:

  • Pizza from nearby &pizza, a location of the popular build-your-own pizza chain.

Drink:

  • Milkshakes from nearby Roaming Rooster, a Black-owned fried chicken sandwich restaurant.

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  • Naylor Gardens, a co-op with well-manicured lawns that once was a housing complex for World War II workers.

Northeast Boundary

The most eastern corner of Washington, D.C., find an 18th century boundary stone, trails, and parks in this neighborhood.

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Penn Branch

Houses in all architectural styles with D.C. skyline views, Penn Branch comes with an active civic association and a shopping center nearby with several Black-owned businesses.

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Randle Highlands

Developed at the turn of the century by the same man who built Congress Heights and Hillcrest, it’s a mainly-residential neighborhood with popular takeout spots and views of the city skyline.

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  • Beer from Wah Sing Restaurant, a Chinese restaurant in a strip mall with a no-frills bar.
  • Tastings at Minnesota Liquors, a large liquor store with a parking lot and regular tastings.

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River Terrace

A neighborhood along the Anacostia River cut off from the city by highways, River Terrace is a quiet community with a newsletter dating back to 1958.

Eat:

  • Wild mushroom biriyani from Daru, an Indian restaurant blocks away near H Street N.E.
  • Shrimp pad Thai from nearby Sala Thai, a Thai restaurant near the Minnesota Avenue Metro station.

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Twining

Often considered part of Dupont Park, Twinning is the area many pass through once they cross the Philip Sousa Bridge East of the River. Once home to a Black-owned farmers market of all Black-owned vendors, there’s much to explore from triangle parks to historic homes.

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