D.C. Ward 5 Neighborhood Guides

Arboretum

Next to the U.S. National Arboretum is a small 1930s neighborhood with a newly‑renovated recreation center.

Eat:

  • Dan dan noodles from nearby Panda Gourmet, a popular Chinese restaurant inside a Days Inn.
  • Pastrami sandwich from nearby Deli City Restaurant, a cash-only restaurant stuck in the 1950s when it first opened.

Drink:

  • Coffee at a cupping the first Friday of every month at 11 a.m. at Small Planes Coffee, a local roastery owned by the same people behind Peregrine Espresso.

Do:

See:

Bloomingdale

Developed in the late 19th century, Bloomingdale is a tight‑knit community with a historic district, a civic association dating back to 1921, carriage houses, a secret alley park, and a cafe popular for weddings.

Eat:

  • Bagel sandwiches at Big Bear Cafe, a Bohemian-style cafe that hosts events like weddings.
  • Chocolate croissant from Sylvan Cafe, a cafe open daily at 8 a.m.
  • Curry goat from Jam Doung Style, a Jamaican restaurant on a corner.
  • “Grandma” breakfast sandwich with scrapple, egg, and cheese at Marty Clarks Uptown, a sandwich shop inside D.C. Mini Super Market.
  • Pasta from The Red Hen, a beloved Italian-inspired restaurant.

Drink:

  • Cocktails at Side Door, a retro speakeasy from Pub and the People open Friday and Saturday evening.
  • Draft beer at Boundary Stone‘s happy hour from 5-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday.
  • Latte from Creative Grounds DC, a corner Black-owned cafe with local art. 

Do:

See:

Brentwood

Named after an 1817 mansion for the city’s first mayor, the industrial area is in transition from a close-knit community with brick rowhouses to new development, including D.C.’s only Home Depot.

Eat:

  • Brisket sandwich at MGM Roast Beef, a 2008 sandwich shop that serves hand-carved meats.
  • Green curry chicken at Sala Thai, a local Thai restaurant with several locations in the city.
  • Neapolitan pizza at nearby Menomale, a pizzeria with sixteen different pizzas.
  • Porchetta sandwich at nearby Salumeria 2703, an Italian market with a deli inside.
  • Salmon nuggets for $10 during happy hour Monday-Friday 4-6 p.m. at nearby Ivy City Smokehouse, a tavern with a rooftop and a seafood market.

Drink:

Do:

  • Attend an event at Whitfield Entertainment Group Studios, a 57,000-square-foot space with a soundstage.
  • Buy holiday trees at Olde City Garden, a mural-decorated garden center that doubles as a community space.
  • Hire willing workers to help build house projects outside of Home Depot, the only one in D.C.
  • Honor two USPS workers who died in 2001 after handling anthrax-contaminated mail meant for U.S. Representative at the United States Postal Service.
  • Read a book at the benches in the small park at 1333 W St NE named the Zaire Kelly Park after a high school student who was killed there in 2017.
  • Take your kids to the enclosed playground at the Brentwood Recreation Center, a space with a baseball field and basketball courts.
  • Test your knowledge at Tuesday Triva Night at nearby Bryant Street Market, a food hall that hosts regular events.
  • Walk to nearby Ivy City and visit all their distilleries like women-owned Republic Restoratives or Italian Don Ciccio & Figli.

See:

Brookland

Often called “Little Rome” for the number of Catholic institutions in the neighborhood, it’s an area with deep Black history, popular local businesses, and a strong community.

Eat:

  • Chicken tikka masala at Masala Story, a popular immigrant-owned Indian restaurant.
  • Corn beef hash at Brookland Grill, a no-frills breakfast spot popular among locals.
  • French onion soup at Primrose, a beautifully decorated restaurant inspired by Paris.
  • Hand-rolled bagels from Bullfrog Bagels, a weekend bagel stand inside Tastemakers, a food hall inside an old factory.
  • Neapolitan pizza at Menomale, a pizzeria that makes it the way history intended. Next door is Italian market Salumeria 2703.
  • Pancake special from Murray & Paul’s, a 1964, cash-only spot with breakfast for under $10.

Drink:

  • Craft beer at Right Proper Brewing, a local brewery with a tasting room open Wednesday through Sunday and a mural on one of its sides.
  • Discounted drinks at Brookland’s Finest‘s all-day happy hour every Monday.
  • Latte from Cool Coffee, a newer coffee shop with a large neon sunglass-wearing smiley face sign outside.
  • Margaritas from San Antonio Bar & Grill, one of the few Tex-Mex restaurants in D.C.

Do:

See:

Carver Langston

A Northeast neighborhood made up of two triangles named after Black scientist and inventor George Washington Carver and John Mercer Langston, the first Black U.S. Representative from Virginia.

Eat:

Drink:

  • More-affordable wine at Aldi, the only location in D.C.

Do:

  • Play golf at the Langston Golf Course, a 1939 course that was the second to desegregate in D.C. that went on to produce golf legends.
  • Terrazzo art by Stephen Weitzman of Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rosa Parks at Starburst Plaza.
  • Walk through the nearby U.S. National Arboretum, a large outdoor space with trails, gardens, and old U.S. Capitol columns.

See:

Eckington

Greeting visitors with a gate that reads “Eckington 1887,” this historic neighborhood has views of the city, old homes, alley murals, and corner markets.

Eat:

Drink:

  •  Craft beer from Lost Generation Brewing Company, a microbrewery inside an old Nabisco factory with 15 drinks on tap, including sours.
  • Single-origin coffee from Qualia Coffee, a coffee shop that sells muffins made by people experiencing homelessness.

Do:

See:

Edgewood

Sometimes called “Little Rome,” Edgewood is full of Catholic institutions, three historic cemeteries, and a growing brewery scene.

Eat:

Drink:

  • Craft beer at City-State Brewing Co., a kid-friendly, dog-friendly taproom with an arcade, games, and rotating food trucks.
  • “Metro Fashioned” from metrobar, a bar and events venue built around a refurbished Metro car.
  • Orange Crush at The Dew Drop Inn, a dive bar in a historic building with happy hour seven days a week.

Do:

See:

Fort Lincoln

Named after the Civil War fort once in the area, it’s a small neighborhood with views of the city and the D.C.’s only Costco.

Eat:

  • “Fitfit breakfast” on injera at nearby Eden’s Kitchen, a top-rated Eritrean restaurant.
  • “Honey Butter” fried chicken sandwich at nearby Roaming Rooster, the original location of the Black-owned fried chicken fast-casual restaurant.
  • Hot dog and soda for $1.50 at Costco, the only one in Washington, D.C.

Drink:

  • Local beer at nearby DC Brau, the city’s oldest brewery brewing, packaging and selling beer within D.C. 

Do:

  • Donate household items at Goodwill Greater Washington, the largest Good Will in the city that accepts donated items daily between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.
  • Explore Fort Lincoln Park, a former Civil War rampart now a public park on a hill with a cultural center, tennis courts, a playground, concrete pavilions, wood walkways and a brick pyramid. 
  • Swim at the Theodore Hagans Pool, one of three outdoor pools in Ward 5, open Memorial Day to Labor Day.
  • Take your kids to nearby Dakota Playground, a space with covered tables, a workout area, and basketball courts.
  • Walk across the border to Maryland’s Fort Lincoln Cemetery and find a 1683 spring house, Civil War defense earthworks, the site of the Battle of Bladensburg, a giant mausoleum with a European-like outdoor courtyard and sculptures.

See:

Fort Totten

Named after a Civil War fort with earthworks visible today, Fort Totten is a small neighborhood with two cemeteries and several charter schools.

Eat:

  • Birria tacos at Mama Chepa, a small Latin American restaurant inside a strip mall.
  • Snacks from Price Grocery, a tiny bodega in honor of the owner’s parents

Drink:

  • Draft beer for half off during happy hour at nearby Slash Run, a rock-n-roll bar with regular shows.

Do:

See:

Gateway

A small industrial neighborhood north of the U.S. National Arboretum, Gateway was the first civilian neighborhood that the B&O Railroad passed through. 

Eat:

Drink:

  •  Cold drinks from Sammy’s Liquors, a mural-decorated liquor store with non-alcoholic grab-n-go bottles.

Do:

See:

  • Mural by Baltimore-born muralist Nether410 on Sammy’s Liquors.

Ivy City

Deep in history and often neglected by the city, Ivy City is emerging as the city’s destination for distilleries, restaurants, and the headquarters for women-owned businesses.

Eat:

  • Chef’s tasting menu on Michelin-star restaurant Gravitas, a restaurant inside an old tomato packing warehouse.
  • Crab cakes from Ivy City Smokehouse, Ivy City’s first neighborhood restaurant.
  • Falafel bowl from Giza Middle Eastern Food, a fast-casual restaurant inside the Hecht Building.
  • Tamales from Ana’s Whole Sale, which provides them for restaurants, but sells to walk-ins for only a few dollars. 

Drink:

Do:

See:

Langdon

Once part of the Maryland colony, the neighborhood once houses a foundry and then Civil War reinforcements. Now it’s home to local restaurants, a large park, an artists warehouse, and one of the city’s few skateparks.

Eat:

  • Crab cake from nearby Provost, a Black-owned restaurant on a mission to bring better-for-you food to Northeast D.C.
  • Jerk chicken at Jerk At Nite, a Black-owned Caribbean restaurant with a food truck.
  • Pastrami sandwich at Deli City Restaurant, a cash-only, family-run shop with decor stuck in the 1950s.
  • Subs from nearby Subbs by Carl, a tiny sandwich shop that’s been on the block for almost 40 years.

Drink:

  • Latte from nearby Zeke’s Coffee, a Baltimore-born roastery with several locations in D.C.
  • Pint of beer at The Public Option, a neighborhood pub, when it reopens.

Do:

See:

Michigan Park (Coming soon)

North Michigan Park (Coming soon)

Pleasant Hill (Coming soon)

Queens Chapel

A neighborhood named after the city’s first Catholic parish now a mostly-residential area.

Eat:

Drink:

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Stronghold

Stronghold is a neighborhood where neighbors know and look out for each other. With an active civic association, the neighborhood got its name after their local youth football team saw a movie about a “stronghold” at nearby Sylvan Theater.

Eat:

  • Local pastries from nearby Creative Grounds DC, a Black-owned coffee shop in Bloomingdale that’s also an art gallery, bookstore and events space.
  • Snacks at Capitol Market, the only corner store in the neighborhood. 

Drink:

Do:

  •  Find an alley garden near 21 Evarts Street NE.
  • Grab a book from the Little Free Library box honoring a neighbor buried at nearby Glenwood Cemetery along Franklin Street NE.
  • Pay respects to mayors, governors and poets at nearby Glenwood Cemetery, a historic cemetery first opened in 1854.
  • Wander every alley and find art, quirky signs and a restored shipping container. 

See:

Trinidad

Once the home of a college, brickworks, and a baseball park, Trinidad is a neighborhood where native Washingtonians and transplants mingle next to alley art and pizza from a rowhouse pop‑up.

Eat:

Drink:

  • “Dealer’s Choice” at nearby The Ella Grace, a small, Black-owned cocktail bar along H Street NE.

Do:

See:

Truxton Circle

Named after a 1900 traffic circle that was removed after causing too many accidents, this small neighborhood is home to historic Dunbar High School, colorful rowhouses, artists studios inside an old warehouse, and restaurants.

Eat:

  • Breakfast tacos at Republic Cantina, a Tex-Mex restaurant started by the support of many Texans in D.C.
  • Chocolate chip cookies from Uncle Chip’s Cookies, a woman-owned cafe inside a teal rowhouse.
  • Croissants from Catania Bakery, a 1932 Italian bakery that’s open to the public on Saturdays only from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Korean fried chicken at Kochix Chicken, a small restaurant with five different sauces for its wings.

Drink:

  • Unlimited mimosas for $24 at Uncaged Mimosas, a Black-owned all-day brunch restaurant.
  • Wine from Domestique Wine, a shop full of natural wines from around the world.

Do:

  • Enjoy art at 11:Eleven Gallery, the city’s only gallery highlighting contemporary and urban art from the United Kingdom. There’s more contemporary art at Mortin Fine Art, a gallery focusing on artists from the African and Global Diaspora.
  • Learn how to play the drums at 7DrumCity, a music school with a small music venue inside.
  • Swim laps at the Dunbar Aquatic Center, an eight-lane indoor pool inside Dunbar High School open to the public.
  • Take your kids to the New York Avenue Playground, an enclosed playground with courts next door. There’s another enclosed playground at the Florida Ave Playground.
  • Visit the open studios three times a year at 52 O Street Studios, the city’s largest artist studio space inside a 1914 warehouse.
  • Volunteer at S.O.M.E., a local nonprofit supporting those who need it the most in D.C.

See:

Woodridge

Along the Maryland border is a quiet neighborhood with a top-rated Eritrean restaurant, the original Roaming Rooster, and many detached single-family homes.

Eat:

  • “Fitfit Breakfast” on injera at Eden’s Kitchen, one of the city’s top Eritrean restaurants.
  • French toast from Provost, a Black-owned restaurant on a mission to bring better-for-you food to Northeast D.C.
  • Honey butter fried chicken sandwich from the original Roaming Rooster, a Black family-owned restaurant with eleven locations throughout the D.C. area.
  • Sandwiches from nearby Subbs by Carl, a Black-owned tiny shop that’s been on the block for 40 years.

Drink:

  • Beer from DC Brau, the city’s first modern brewery with a taproom open Thursday through Sunday.
  • Coffee from Zeke’s Coffee, a Baltimore-born roastery with coffee and food.
  • “Hawaij Mocha” (a Yemeni spice blend) from Emma’s Torch, a NYC-born cafe that employs refugees and asylees, providing culinary and employability training.

Do:

See:

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