D.C. Ward 6 Neighborhood Guides

Barney Circle

A small neighborhood named after the traffic circle by the Sousa Bridge, many often consider it part of Hill East.

Eat:

  • Green curry from Sala Thai, a Thai restaurant with locations throughout the city. 
  • “Pretzel Bomb,” a Nutella-filled pretzel roll, from nearby The Pretzel Bakery, the city’s only pretzel bakery.

Drink:

  • Sour ale at nearby Shelter, a bar with a rotating list of beers inside The Roost
  • Vanilla latte from nearby Cameo, a coffee shop inside The Roost.

Do:

See:

  • Muralist Mimi Ton‘s work of RBG and other women heroes in Duvall Court SE. 
  • Mural showing solidarity with Ukraine by Nils Westergard on a garage near GreenSEED Community Garden, an organic community garden in the alley at 17th and D Streets SE. 
  • Neoclassical architecture at the Anne Archbold Hall, a now-closed 1930s residence hall for nurses. 
  • Totem poles from Lummi Nation within Congressional Cemetery

Capitol Hill

The most populated neighborhood in the city, Capitol Hill is soaked in history hidden in alleys, popular restaurants, and epics views of the city skyline.

Eat:

  • Blueberry buckwheat pancakes from Market Lunch, a no-frills breakfast/lunch counter inside Eastern Market, the city’s oldest continuously-operating market.
  • Burger from Beuchert’s Saloon, a new American restaurant in a small, well-designed space.
  • “DL’s Egg Drop” breakfast sandwich at I Egg You, an egg-heavy restaurant along Barracks Row that also sells Vietnamese Egg Coffee (coffee with egg yolk and condensed milk froth).
  • French toast from Le Bon Cafe, a tiny French cafe literal steps away from the U.S. Capitol.
  • Hot cakes from Jimmy T’s, a no-frills cafe inside a Victorian corner rowhouse.
  • Soy-glazed brisket from Chiko, a tiny takeout-only Korean-Chinese fusion restaurant.

Drink:

  • Coffee flight at Junction Bistro & Bar, a Alexandria-founded bistro with weekend brunch deals.
  • Frozen margaritas from Santa Rosa, a taqueria and margarita bar with a chorizo and egg taco on the menu.
  • Gin cocktails at The Betsy, an alley rooftop gin garden with $1 fries during happy hour.
  • Latte from Peregrine Espresso, one the city’s longest-standing independent coffee shops. (They brew beans roasted in D.C. from Small Planes.)

Do:

  • Attend a cooking class at the Hill Center, a non-profit that hosts classes and events inside the building that was D.C.’s first Naval hospital.
  • Browse used and rare books at Capitol Hill Books, a 1991 used bookstore inside an 1891 rowhouse filled with books, including in the bathroom. For new books, stop by East City Bookshop, a women-owned shop filled with two floors of books.
  • Donate art to Free Little Art Gallery DC, a Little Free Library box filled with local art for anyone to take along East Capitol Street SE.
  • Find murals in alleys like the garage mural of rowhouses in Rumsey Court SE.
  • Go on a date to Little Pearl, a top-rated restaurant inside a historic carriage house with a $105 7-course menu. With the same owner, Rose’s Luxury nearby is still a popular dining spot.
  • Honor abolitionist Frederick Douglass by visiting his old house at 316 A Street NE.
  • Read the plaques and enjoy the art on the historic call boxes found throughout Capitol Hill. Many of them honor women.
  • Take your kids to multiple playgrounds like Stanton Park for younger kids and Garfield Park for older.
  • See a participatory play inside a 19th century church with Saint Mark’s Players.
  • Watch an $8 movie at the Miracle Theatre, built in 1909.

See:

  • Animal sculptures (called “Alphabet Animals”) on light posts thanks to Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, an organization that offers music, ceramics, dance, and other art classes for youth and adults. Here’s a map and article about the Alphabet Animals.
  • Art at Triple Candie Gallery, a 24/7 art gallery seen through the windows of an old Little Tavern (a beloved burger chain that’s now closed) building.
  • Coca-Cola ghost sign on the side of an old rowhouse at 420 South Capitol Street SE.
  • Ebenezer United Methodist Church, the neighborhood’s first Black congregation and home to the city’s first publicly financed Black schools in the 19th century.
  • Maples, the neighborhood’s oldest building built in between 1795 and 1795 in the Late Georgian-style.
  • Mary McLeod Bethune Statue, one of three D.C. outdoor statues honoring U.S. women in public spaces, at Lincoln Park, the neighborhood’s largest public park once home to the city’s largest hospital.
  • Murals in the alley along Barracks Row between 8th and 9th Streets SE and E and G Streets SE.
  • Shakespeare play at the Folger Theatre, whose library houses the world’s largest collection of the printed works of William Shakespeare.
  • Views of the U.S. Capitol from Spirit of Justice Park, a two-block hidden park on top of a Congressional parking lot.

Judiciary Square

Deep with history, the area is home to many hidden gems like a gilded fountain and the oldest memorial to Lincoln.

Eat:

  • Caesar salad at L’Ardente, an Italian restaurant with weekend brunch.
  • Oysters from Bar Spero, a seafood bar from award-winning chef Johnny Spero.
  • Pastrami sandwich at Jack’s Famous Deli, a no‑frills deli that’s open during the week from 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Ramen from Daikaya, a small ramen restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating.
  • Sushi at Love, Makoto, a collection of Japanese restaurants.

Drink:

  • Beer from the Mid‑Atlantic at Free State, a cocktail bar open every night until 2 a.m.
  • Matcha latte from SakuSaku Flakerie, a bakery with Japanese‑inspired pastries inside the National Building Museum.

Do:

See:

Kingman Park

Developed in the 1920s as the city’s first single‑family home neighborhood specifically for the Black community, Kingman Park is an area with many native Washingtonians who care deeply about community.

Eat:

  • Bulgogi from Manna Korean BBQ & Dosirak, a small Korean takeout restaurant run by a husband‑wife team.
  • Catfish from Hip Hop Fish & Chicken, a fast-food spot along Benning Road N.E.
  • Sesame chicken from Hong Kong Carryout, a small Chinese takeout spot popular among locals.
  • Wild mushroom biryani from nearby Daru, an acclaimed innovative Indian restaurant.

Drink:

  • Coffee from The Hill Cafe, a corner coffee shop open daily.
  • Grab‑n‑go drinks from The Cupboard Market, a local convenience store with a community library inside.

Do:

  • Buy D.C.‑inspired candy from the Capital Candy Jar, a success story of the food incubator Union Kitchen.
  • Find the Demetrius Shealey‘s “Speak Your Dreams Into Existence” mural along Gales Place NE near 17th Street NE.
  • Get to know the history of Minor Elementary School, an 1851 school that paved the way for the education of D.C.’s Black community.
  • Learn facts about the city at the D.C. landmark‑themed playground at the Rosedale Recreation Center, which triples as a library and pool.
  • Shop local at the longstanding farmers market in the RFK Stadium parking lot near Benning Road NE on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
  • Skate at Maloof Skate Park, one of the few skate parks in the city in front of the historic RFK Stadium’s main entrance.
  • Stop by the Kingman Park‑Rosedale Community Garden, which started in 2005, but has roots in the neighborhood since the 1940s.
  • Take your kids to The Fields at RFK, a large, confidence‑building playground with a large slide and the Metro passing above ground nearby.

See:

  • Birds and other wildlife at Kingman Island, a 1916 man‑made island with trails, over 100 local and migratory species of birds.
  • Ginkgo trees along the 1500 block of Gales Street N.E.
  • Gothic architecture at 1890 Eastern High School, a high school with tennis courts, basketball courts, and track open to the public when school is not in session.

Mount Vernon Triangle

An area dominated by high rise apartment buildings, this neighborhood dates back to L’Enfant’s original plan for the city.

Eat:

  • Biscuit sammies from A Baked Joint, a popular cafe that opens daily at 7:30 a.m.
  • Cashew labneh from Shouk, a plant‑based fast‑casual restaurant.
  • Chicken green curry from Baan Siam, a popular Thai restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating.
  • Pizza at Stellina Pizzeria, a popular pizzeria with a waffle menu at this location only.
  • “Tikka Chance On Me” bowl from Rasa, a fast‑casual Indian restaurant with a colorful door.

Drink:

  • German beer at Prost DC, a bar with a rotating list of German and Austrian beer.
  • Latte at Chez Lily, a dog‑friendly cafe named after the owner’s dog.
  • “Sojutinis” for $8 at Mandu, a family‑run Korean restaurant with happy hour every day.
  • Wine from Bar Chinois, a Chinese restaurant with French‑inspired wine and cocktails.

Do:

  • Honor legacy at Bible Way Church, a historic Black congregation that is known for its community outreach and activism.
  • Learn about history at First Tabernacle Bethel, an 1857 wooden chapel allegedly a stop on the Underground Railroad.
  • See contemporary art at Hemphill Artworks, a 1993 art gallery open Tuesday‑Saturday 12‑5 p.m.
  • Visit the DC History Center‘s exhibits inside the Carnegie Library, a 1903 library that’s the city’s first desegregated public building and now an Apple store.

See:

Near Northeast

Once a hub for Black Americans and immigrant communities- Irish, Russian-Jews, Germans, and others- Near Northeast is a neighborhood in transition as local businesses open and close along H Street NE. It’s an area with hidden murals, historic churches, and some of the city’s best food.

Eat:

  • Chicken green curry from Tiki Garden Thai Street Food, a new family-owned Thai restaurant.
  • Fondue from Stable, a Swiss restaurant with “Make Your Own” brunch mimosas.
  • Kingston Kurry Chicken at Jerk at Night, a popular Caribbean restaurant that started as a food truck.
  • Mussels at Grandville Moore’s, a small Belgian restaurant once highlighted by The New York Times.
  • Pizza from The Little Grand, a small alley bar and restaurant. Old City Market and Oven, a corner store, sells worthy pizza too.
  • Taipei Curry Chicken ramen at Toki Underground, a small, second-floor ramen restaurant with cocktails and miso-butter-creme cookies.
  • Trini-Chinese Style Chicken from Cane, an award-winning, Black-owned Caribbean restaurant.
  • Turkish breakfast at Sospeso, a Mediterranean restaurant run by a husband-wife team.

Drink:

  • Ale at The Queen Vic, a popular British pub with a $25 Sunday beef roast.
  • “Bartender’s Choice” at Copycat, a small cocktail bar where bartenders visit after hours. Don’t sleep on their dan dan noodles off the food menu.
  • “Bronze” cocktail from Bronze, a Black-owned fine dining restaurant inspired by Afrofuturism.
  • Chai latte from Ebenezers Coffeehouse, a coffee shop inside a former drug house now owned by the National Community Church.
  • Cocktails at The Ella Grace, an intimate, Black-owned cocktail bar.
  • Coffee from Sidamo Coffee & Tea, a family-owned, no-frills cafe that used to host Ethiopian coffee ceremonies.
  • Makulay latte from Hiraya, a Filipino all-day cafe with colorful lattes.
  • Vanilla late from The Wydown, a well-designed coffee shop inside The Apollo where guests can use Wi-Fi in their lobby.
  • Wine from Irregardless, a restaurant that curates wine from Virginia.

Do:

See:

NoMa

Named the country’s “fastest-growing neighborhood,” the area once housed farmland and an immigrant community called Swampoodle. Today, murals, public art, and history are hidden among apartment buildings.

Eat:

  • Birria from Little Minor Taco, a taco takeout spot in an alley.
  • Burrata margherita pie from Andy’s Pizza inside Streets Market, a local grocery store.
  • Butter chicken from Indigo, a family-owned Indian restaurant inside a colorful rowhouse.
  • Chicken curry at Laos in Town, a popular Laotian restaurant with an outdoor patio.
  • Meatball sandwich from Salumeria NoMa, an Italian deli that sells fresh pasta, cured meats, and cheese with its original location in Brookland.
  • Neapolitan pizza from Menomale, often considered among the best pizza in D.C.

Drink:

  • Beer at Wunder Garten, a spacious beer garden with 16 beers on tap.
  • Cider at Red Bear Brewing Company, a LGBTQIA+-owned brewing with 20+ drinks on tap and board games for visitors.
  • Cocktails at Nice & Easy, a biker dive bar down an alley with weekend live music.
  • Flat white from Simona Cafe, a cafe open daily with Wi-Fi and outlets.

Do:

  • Bike along the Metropolitan Brand Trail, which goes from Union Station to Maryland with murals along the way.
  • Collect stamps at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum, an interactive museum about the postal system that’s beloved by locals.
  • Donate non-perishable food items to the Father McKenna Center, a non-profit serving those struggling with homelessness and food insecurity, inside a historic Catholic church.
  • Enjoy a book on one of the benches at Swampoodle Terrace, a small park with a rowhouse mural.
  • Honor history at the Dorothy I. Height Post Office, the first federal building named after a Black woman.
  • Read the news at the entrance of NPR’s headquarters. Pre-pandemic, visitors were allowed to tour the building.
  • Stroll through nearby La Cosecha and Union Market, two food halls with many Latin American and local businesses.
  • Take your kids to the vertical playground often mistaken for a dog park at the Swampoodle Dog Park & Playground.
  • Visit the National Guard Memorial Museum open to the public for free Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Walk the rooftop labyrinth, the only one in D.C., at the American Psychological Association at 10 G Street NE. It’s open to the public during regular business hours Monday through Friday.
  • Watch trains pass from the tables behind the building at 900 2nd Street NE.

See:

Southwest Waterfront

18th-century rowhouses, a Titanic memorial, a technicolor church, a community duck pond, Southwest Waterfront is one of the city’s most historic neighborhoods with a tight community.

Eat:

  • Falafel from Falafel Inc, a restaurant that gives back to refugees.
  • “Minelli” sandwich from Grazie Grazie, a sandwich shop from the owners of Taylor Gourmet.

Drink:

Do:

See:

Sursum Corda

Next to the U.S. National Arboretum is a small 1930s neighborhood with a newly‑renovated recreation center.

Eat:

  • Bread from nearby Catania Bakery, a 1932 Italian bakery that sells pastries and bread Friday and Saturday mornings until they run out.
  • Breakfast tacos at nearby Republic Cantina, a Tex‑Mex restaurant that’s popular among Texans living in D.C.
  • Pizza from nearby Andy’s Pizza, a popular pizzeria inside Streets Market.

Drink:

  • Beer from nearby Wunder Garten, a spacious beer garden with a large drink menu.
  • Latte from nearby Simona Cafe, a craft coffee shop that does pour overs.

Do:

See:

  • Dinosaur murals behind the Perry School building at 128 M Street NW.
  • View of the U.S. Capitol from New Jersey Ave NW.

Swampoodle

Now mostly incorporated within NoMa, Swampoodle is a small neighborhood that housed mainly Irish immigrants who helped build the U.S. Capitol and the White House.

Eat:

  • Breakfast burritos for $2.50 from the Mission Muffins food stand in front of Central Union Mission, one of the oldest non‑profits in the city that runs the workforce development program.
  • Butter chicken from nearby Indigo, a popular family‑owned Indian restaurant with outdoor seating.
  • Chicken at District Rico, a fast‑casual Peruvian restaurant.

Drink:

Do:

  • Collect old stamps at the National Postal Museum, a Smithsonian open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with free admission.
  • Honor the National Guard at the nearby National Guard Memorial Museum open Monday‑Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free admission.
  • Support the Father McKenna Center, a day program for men experiencing homelessness.
  • Take your kids to the nearby Swampoodle Playground, an enclosed, vertical playground.
  • Visit the Holodomor Genocide Memorial, a 2015 memorial to the victims of the Ukrainian Famine‑Genocide of 1932–33.
  • Walk the city’s only rooftop labyrinth at the office building at 10 G Street NW. The public can access it during work hours Monday-Friday.
  • Watch the trains pass while sitting at one of the tables in the back of 900 2nd St NE.

See:

  • 1861 architecture at the U.S. Government Publishing Office.
  • Digital art at the underpass along K Street NE in between 1st and 2nd Streets NE.
  • “Hopscotch” mosaic art along H Street NE near Union Station by artist Deirdre Saunder.
  • Murals by Martin Swift and Hanna Söderholm at 25 K Street NE.
  • Renaissance architecture at St. Aloysius Church, an 1859 church that once catered to local Irish Catholics.
  • Student‑led play twice a year at Gonzaga’s Sheehy Theater, the oldest continuously‑operating theater in D.C.
  • “Trigadilly” sculpture by Chas Colburn outside of the CNN building.
  • U.S. Capitol building from the front of Union Station, a 1907 train station that’s one of the country’s busiest.

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