D.C. Ward 4 Neighborhood Guides

Barnaby Woods (Coming soon)

Brightwood

A neighborhood with many names before Brightwood once the site of a horse racetrack with historic homes, a well-preserved Civil War fort, an active community association, and the largest immigrant community in D.C.

Eat:

Drink:

Do:

  • Join the waitlist for the Peabody Community Garden, a large garden cared for by senior gardeners.
  • Take your kids to the large playground at the Fort Stevens Recreation Center, a space with a field and tennis and basketball courts.
  • Walk the trails at the nearby 1909 Walter Reed campus that’s being redeveloped into The Parks. Find the Arts Plaza and old memorials.

See:

Brightwood Park

Coming soon

Colonial Village (Coming soon)

Crestwood

A long way from the decades where racial covenants were placed on property, Crestwood is now a diverse neighborhood surrounded by Rock Creek Park on three sides.

Eat:

  • Belgian waffles at nearby The Highlands, a 2008 neighborhood restaurant famous for their chicken and waffles.
  • Carne con tajadas from nearby Catrachitos Restaurant, the city’s first Honduran restaurant.
  • Gyro for under $10 at nearby Athena Grill, a small popular Greek spot.

Drink:

  • Latte from Baltimore‑based coffee roastery Zeke’s Coffee Uptown location nearby.
  • Sangria from nearby Atxondo, a Spanish restaurant that serves grilled octopus and other favorites.

Do:

See:

Hawthorne (Coming soon)

Manor Park

A Northwest neighborhood where community is formed in triangle parks and through a 100-year-old civic association.

Eat:

  • Jerk chicken at Peaches Kitchen Restaurant, an immigrant woman-owned sit-down restaurant with “Fried Chicken Wednesdays.”
  • Street tacos from Chef Jaren every Tuesday inside Jackie Lee’s, a popular neighborhood restaurant and bar.

Drink:

  • Chacho (a South American spirit infused with cane sugar and jalapeño) at Chacho Spirits, a distillery with Saturday tours and a tasting room.
  • Coffee from La Coop Coffee, a family-owned coffee shop inside a house with a porch that brews beans from their coffee co-op in Guatemala.
  • Fresh juice from Senbeb Cafe, a vegan/vegetarian soul food restaurant open daily with a Sunday brunch.

Do:

See:

Petworth

Triangle parks, neighborhood festivals, top‑rated restaurants, Petworth has emerged from farmland to one of D.C.’s hippest neighborhoods.

Eat:

  • Balsamic tart cherry with blood orange scones from Little Food Studio, a Black woman‑owned cafe that opened during the pandemic.
  • Fried chicken from The Hitching Post, a 1967 soul food restaurant.
  • Pho from Pho Viet, a Vietnamese restaurant with 14 kinds of pho.
  • Pizza from Timber Pizza Co., a popular pizza restaurant that started out of a pickup truck.
  • Ramen from Menya Hosaki, a small shop that started as a pop‑up.
  • Tacos in corn tortillas from Taqueria Habanero, a popular Mexican restaurant that also serves margaritas.

Drink:

  • Beer at Red Derby, a popular bar with half price chicken tenders on Tuesdays.
  • Drip coffee from Büna Coffeehouse, a corner cafe that also sells breakfast sandwiches.
  • Hard cider from a stir (formerly Capital Cider House), a cidery that hosts regular events.
  • Lattes from Rue Café, a new cafe serving Ethiopian coffee.

Do:

See:

  • Comedy at Room 808, a space that hosts comedy shows five nights a week.
  • (Here I Stand) in the Spirit of Paul Robeson sculpture by artist Allen Uzikee Nelson inside the triangle park at Kansas Ave NW, Georgia Ave NW and Varnum St NW.
  • Jose Piedra’s mural on the side of Hen & Fin, a seafood restaurant.
  • Local art inside Art of Noize, a speakeasy art gallery inside an alley.
  • Micro art at the Free Little Art Gallery, a Little Free Library that showcases art at Illinois Ave NW and Webster Street NW.

Riggs Park (Coming soon)

Shepherd Park (Coming soon)

Sixteenth Street Heights

Developed in the early 20th century once the streetcar connected to downtown, the neighborhood is one of the most diverse areas in D.C. Mainly residential, there are dozens of churches and places to worship in Sixteenth Street Heights.

Eat:

  • Baleadas (breakfast burritos) from Catrachitos Restaurant, a popular Honduran restaurant with murals on one of its sides.
  • Build-your-own platter at Hedzole, a Black woman-owned Ghanaian-American fast casual spot.
  • Carna asada sandwich at Simple Bar and Grill, a no-frills bar with regular events.
  • Chicken and waffles from The Highlands, a Black-owned cafe with two locations in the city.
  • Gyros from Athena Grill, a tiny Greek restaurant.
  • Tibs from Gueny’s Cafe & Market, an Ethiopian restaurant with friendly owners open every day from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Drink:

  • Coffee from Gold Coast Cafe, a corner market with a cafe inside.
  • Cocktails, including a “Pumpkin Spice White Russian,” at Moreland’s Tavern, a popular neighborhood restaurant and bar.
  • Latte from Zeke’s Coffee-Uptown, the newest location of the Baltimore-born coffee roastery.
  • Sangria for $6 at Spanish restaurant Atxondo‘s happy hour Tuesday-Saturday from 3-5 p.m.

Do:

See:

Takoma

Rooted in activism, Takoma is an area with a coffee roaster in a 1924 theater, colorful Little Free Libraries, and hyper local restaurants.

Eat:

  • Fried fish at Horace and Dickies, a local seafood restaurant connected to the beloved original location on H Street N.E.
  • Injera from Nile Ethiopian Restaurant, a family‑owned restaurant with a market that opened on the Maryland border in 1996.
  • Vegan donuts at Donut Run, a small shop open daily at 7 a.m. posting changing flavors on Instagram.

Drink:

  • Ethiopian coffee at Tomoka Coffee House, a small coffee shop inside a strip mall.
  • Pour over coffee at Lost Sock Roasters, a roastery inside a historic theater that also sells empanadas daily.
  • Smoothies from Turning Natural, a Black woman‑owned juice bar inside a 1924 theater.

Do:

See:

  • Art Deco architecture outside the Whittier Gardens, a condo complex built in 1928.
  • Art exhibits at Rhizome DC, a DIY art space inside a house that hosts events and workshops.
  • Ida B. Wells statue in front of Ida B. Wells Middle School honoring the journalist and civil rights activist.
  • “From A Model To A Rainbow” mural by Sam Gilliam outside the Takoma Metro.

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